The holidays haven’t yet come and gone, but as we eye books hitting shelves in December, we see a slew of titles perfect for those ready to get a jump-start on their New Year’s resolutions.

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The Whole30 Cookbook

By Melissa Hartwig (HMH, Dec. 6)

The fourth book from Hartwig, sports nutritionist and cocreator of the popular Whole30 plan. In keeping with the program, the recipes emphasize eggs, meat, fish, and fresh vegetables, but no grains, dairy, legumes or added sugars. According to our review, “whether or not one buys into Whole30, there is no denying that Hartwig has come up with a clever array of healthy and flavorful dishes.”

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Eight Flavors. The Untold Story of American Cuisine

By Sarah Lohman (S&S, Dec. 6)

We starred this “entertaining tour through the tastes that have made American food the ‘most complex and diverse cuisine on the planet.’” Food writer Lohman’s “conversational style and infectious curiosity make the book wholly delightful,” and “gives fascinating new insight into what we eat.”

 

Taste of Home 100 Family Meals: Bringing the Family Back to the Table

By the editors of Taste of Home (Reader’s Digest/Taste of Home, Dec. 27)

For the resolution-makers who want a little more togetherness, a cookbook of 100 family meals (358 recipes in total).

Eat Beautiful: Food and Recipes to Nourish Your Skin from the Inside Out

By Wendy Rowe (Clarkson Potter, Dec. 27)

Makeup artist and beauty consultant Rowe spells out ways to “feed” your skin, with ingredients such as pomegranate (“The Elixir of Youth”), spinach, and natural red wine. The book features a foreword by actress Sienna Miller.

 

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The Wellness Mama Cookbook: 200 Easy-to-Prepare Recipes and Time-Saving Advice for the Busy Cook

By Katie Wells (Harmony, Dec. 27)

The creator of the Wellness Mama blog shows how to eliminate processed foods from family meals in favor of a healthful eating plan. “She marshals current prescriptive-eating hits such as bone broth, maple syrup, cauliflower standing in for starch, and the ubiquitous coconut in myriad forms,” says our review.